"if you are neutral in situations of injustice, you have chosen
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Director of documentary on Sikh Genocide honoured at Surrey Sikh temple Featured

Teenaa Kaur Pasricha was honoured in Surrey on Sunday, October 27.

Her documentary, When the Sun Didn’t Rise, is based on the sufferings of the victims of state sponsored massacre of the Sikhs following the assassination of then-Prime Minister Indira Gandhi by her Sikh bodyguards on October 31, 1984.

Thousands of Sikhs were slaughtered across India during the violence that was well-organized by the slain leader’s ruling Congress party with the help of the police.

The film is based on her interviews with survivors of the violence, and orphaned children who have grown into drug addicts because of a lack of support. It is the first serious effort to open a dialogue with those who continue to suffer long-term inter-generational effects of the bloodshed.

Close to the 35th anniversary of the genocide, the members of Guru Nanak Singh Temple, Surrey-Delta presented her with the robe of honour in the presence of the huge congregation which had gathered to celebrate Diwali and Bandi Chhor Divas. Speaking on the occasion, Pasricha appealed to the gathering to continue to raise voices against repression anywhere in the world according to the Sikh traditions.

Being a Sikh woman herself, Pasricha was personally affected by the violence. One of her uncles was attacked by the mob, and his hair was forcibly cut by the assailants. For a practising Sikh, keeping long hair is a sacred duty. She had learnt from her mother how her uncle remained depressed for some time because of the humiliation.

She went beyond making the film and has been trying to help people suffering long-term consequences of the massacre, especially those who have become drug users.

Pasricha is here for the screening of her film on Saturday, November 2 at Room 120, C.K. Choi Building in University of British Columbia, between 1 – 6 pm. The screening is part of the event titled "Patterns of Political Violence: 35 Years Since 1984" being organized by the Centre for India and South Asian Research.

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Last modified on Tuesday, 29 October 2019 23:14
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